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Borobudur Temple - 800 AD

Borobudur Temple (337 - 422 AD) already existed when F-Huan came to the Land of Java Jakarta ( DreamLandLibrary ) - Borobudur is ...

Plaosan Temple - Year 864 AD

Jakarta (Dreamland Library) - Plaosan Temple is located in Bugisan Village, Prambanan District, Klaten Regency, approximately 1.5 km to the east of Sewu Temple.

This temple is an ancient building complex which is divided into two, namely the Plaosan Lor Temple complex (lor in Javanese means north) and the Plaosan Kidul Temple complex (kidul in Javanese means south).

The sculptures found in Plaosan Temple are very delicate and detailed, similar to those found in Borobudur Temple, Sewu Temple, and Sari Temple.

Plaosan Temple which is a Buddhist temple by experts is estimated to have been built during the reign of Rakai Pikatan from the Hindu Mataram Kingdom, namely in the early 9th century AD

One expert who supports that opinion is De Casparis who holds the contents of the Cri Kahulunan Inscription (842 AD). The inscription stated that Plaosan Lor Temple was built by Ratu Sri Kahulunan, with the support of her husband.

According to De Casparis, Sri Kahulunan is the title of Pramodhawardani, daughter of King Samarattungga of the House of Syailendra. The Princess, who converted to Buddhism, married Rakai Pikatan from the Sanjaya Dynasty, who embraced Hinduism.

Another opinion regarding the construction of the Plaosan Temple is that the temple was built before the reign of Rakai Pikatan. According to Anggraeni, what is meant by Sri Kahulunan is Rakai Garung's mother who ruled Mataram before Rakai Pikatan.

Rakai Pikatan's reign was too short to be able to build a temple as big as Plaosan Temple. Rakai Pikatan built the Perwara temple after the construction of the main temple.

In October 2003, in a complex near the Perwara Temple in the Plaosan Kidul Temple complex, an inscription estimated to originate from the 9th century AD was made from a gold plate measuring 18.5 X 2.2 cm. it contains writing in Sanskrit written using Old Javanese letters.

The contents of the inscription are still unknown, but according to Tjahjono Prasodjo, the epigraph assigned to read it, the inscription reinforces the notion that Plaosan Temple was built during the reign of Rakai Pikatan.

Plaosan Lor
Plaosan Lor Temple is a large temple complex. In front (west) of the Plaosan Lor complex there are two pairs of Dwarapala statues facing each other, a pair located at the north entrance and a pair at the southern entrance.

Each statue as tall as a human being is in a sitting position on his right leg which is folded with his left leg bent in front of the body. His right hand holds a mace, while his left hand hangs above his left knee.

In the northern court there is a square shaped stone terrace surrounded by rows of stone pedestals. Allegedly the stone terrace is a place to put offerings. It is said that on the terrace there was a wooden building, while on top of each of the pedestals there was a statue of Dhyani Buddha.

A similar but smaller terrace is also found in the south of the Plaosan Lor Temple complex. In the north court of the Plaosan Temple complex there are also 6 large stupas.

At the center of the Plaosan Lor Temple complex there are two two-story buildings which are the main temples. The two buildings face west and each is surrounded by a stone fence.

The stone wall that encloses each of the main temples is surrounded by perwara temples which originally numbered 174, consisting of 58 small temples with a square base and 116 stupa-shaped buildings.

Seven temples line up on each north and south side of each main temple, 19 temples line east or behind the two main temples, while 17 more temples line up in front of the two main temples. Almost all of the ancillary temples are currently in ruins.

In each corner of the Perwara temple there is still another small temple surrounded by two rows of pedestals which are also interspersed with a small temple in each corner.

On the west side of the stone fence surrounding each of the main buildings there is a gate in the form of the gate of Paduraksa, with a roof decorated with a row of small crowns. The roof of the archway is square in shape with a small crown on it.

Each of the main temple buildings stands on feet about 60 cm high without the hall that surrounds the body. The stairs leading to the door are equipped with ladder cheeks that have dragon head ornaments on the base. The door frame is decorated with sculptured motifs of flowers and tendrils. Above the doorway there is a Kala headdress without a lower jaw.

Along the outer walls of the two main temples the body is decorated with reliefs depicting men and women who are standing in a size that is close to the size of a real human. Relief on the temple wall in the south depicts men, while in the temple in the north depicts women.

The interior of the two main buildings is divided into six rooms, three rooms are located below, while the other three rooms are located on the second level. The floorboards that limit the two levels are now gone, but the walls of the former grooves are still visible.

In the middle room there are 3 statues of Buddha sitting in a row above padadmasana facing the door, but the statue of Buddha in the middle has disappeared. On the walls on the left and right side of the room there is a niche that seems to be a place to put lighting. The niche is flanked by Kuwera and Hariti reliefs.

On the left and right, near the main door, there are connecting doors to the side room. The arrangement in the other two lower rooms, both in the north building and in the south building, is similar to the arrangement in the living room. On the east side there are 3 statues of Buddha sitting in a row on padadmasana facing west. The Buddha statue in the middle has also disappeared.

Plaosan Kidul
Plaosan Kidul Temple is located south of Plaosan Lor Temple, separated by a highway. When in the Palosan Lor complex the two main temples still stand majestically, in the Plaosan Kidul Temple complex the main temple is left in ruins. Only a few ancillary temples remain.

When shooting, in May 2003, excavation and restoration of the Plaosan Kidul Temple was underway.

Source: http://candi.pnri.go.id/jawa_tengah_yogyakarta/plaosan/plaosan.htm
Photo: Special

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